Script for Video-Urban Agriculture (& Archery)



LOIS GASKIN (GSD Groundskeeper, Archery Coach, 21st Century Instructor): How did urban ag get started? That's a big question. Lynne Russell came to me…We was discussing how we might get some of these kids to learn something extra after school, and she knew about this 21st Century grant program. And the two really go hand-in-hand. You're planting plants, you do that kind of thing. We propagate. We grow from seeds, we take cuttings. You get your hands dirty. And then there's that sunny day that they don't necessarily want to be in the green house. So that's where archery comes in. Archery tends to have a big impact on a kid's life once they learn to do that. It's kind of like a chess game, and it causes them to concentrate more. We take our patience and the love of nature to the archery range.

"You need to keep you bow vertical at all times, dude."
"And don't drop your bow. Keep it solid until you shoot."

It attracts kids that would have never been attracted to the agriculture part, and they kind of seem to find something they like and enjoy. Because you can't beat dirt therapy. You can't spend enough money on therapy to beat dirt therapy. It's just so relaxing. I don't know, you can stick your hand in the dirt…and you feel better already.

LOIS: "Tell him where we got these seeds from."

CASEY: "Uh, you."

LOIS: Casey here's my gardener, and his daddy is a big farmer in Holcomb. I plant watermelon, sweet corn, tomatoes…cucumbers, uh…That's about it. And raise my chickens and rabbits. I mean like the the planting stuff. I like getting in the dirt, so…. …and how the plants turn out…it's beautiful.

TREY: I like doing things outdoors. It's fun, and Mrs. Gaskin is a really great teacher.

JACKSON: "There's some pretty tomatoes."

LOIS "Yes, they are pretty, aren't they?"

JACKSON: "What is this?"

LOIS: "That's how I stuck holes the cup. You know you gotta have drainage holes, see, when you water them." "You got to have…the water's got to get out of the cup." LOIS: "See how much better that tomato looks?" And I think the kids are a lot more observant of what they see outside now. I mean they don't look at flowers the same way – just dumb old flowers. It just touches something in them just like the dirt therapy does. Without flower parts, we don't eat anything. I mean, we would literally starve to death because we're so dependent. If we are not eating vegetable themselves, we're eating something that ate vegetables. So…and that's where…archery can tie into this also is…we need protein. You can go out once you shoot these bows. It gives you the best basics ever for shooting archery. Take up archery with a different style of bow, and you've got your protein. You back to nature. Hey, that's what I'm talking about. I got the real stuff! And dirt is wonderful, I'm just gonna tell ya…

And, you know, we look at the flower parts and…"

Thanks to Lois Gaskin and her Urban Agriculture/Archery class, made possible by the 21st Century Grant through the Mississippi Department of Education.

Filmed and edited by Jamie Kornagay for the Grenada School District

Birds chirping